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Carbohydrates…how low can you go?

It has been suggested via the UK’s Food Standards Agency (FSA), that individuals consume 60% of their calories from carbohydrates.
This works out at a HUGE 400 grams for the average male, and 320 grams for the average female.

We must bear in mind that throughout the course of evolution, humans had no pasta, bread and certainly no ice cream!!

It can therefore be said that early man consumed less than half the carbohydrates than his successors do. (Cordain 2005)

The simple carbs. By this term we talk about processed foods, refined sugar and general not-so-good items like white pasta, white bread, lollies, chips, chocolate and soft drinks.

No surprise therefore, that a number of advantages exist in restricting your simple carbohydrate intake. Consider the wide range of health problems resulting from excessive consumption of this type of carbohydrate:

  • cardiovascular issues
  • type 2 diabetes
  • impaired neural function
  • suppressed immune system activity

On the flip side and as important to discuss are the low-carb diets that can compromise output of thyroid hormones.(Spaulding 1976)

It would seem clear then that the issue confronting us is finding a level of carbohydrate intake that supports optimum health, maximises fat burning, and represents a sustainable and realistic dietary protocol.

Easier said than done?! However definitely achievable.

Never forget that carbohydrates are only used for energy…. Which means intake reflects expenditure through physical activity.
Bottom line is, too many simple carbohydrates (sugars, processed foods) make people unhealthy and fat.
Weight loss can be achieved; with help from a professional; if you focus on what is most efficient as opposed to the various low carb diets capitalising on the public’s hunger for options.

This is where I will leave you all. My next post will focus on the more involved issues regarding our diets and the metabolic process.

Viv xx

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